Theatre of Varieties by Aldous Huxley

The Doors of Perception is a philosophical essay, released as a book, by Aldous Huxley. First published in 1954, it details his experiences when taking mescaline. The book takes the form of Huxley's recollection of a mescaline trip that took place over the course of an afternoon in May 1953. The book takes its title from a phrase in William Blake's 1793 poem The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. Huxley recalls the insights he experienced, which range from the "purely aesthetic" to "sacramental vision".[1] He also incorporates later reflections on the experience and its meaning for art and religion.
The Fifth Cycle of the Wheels poetry anthology was published in 1920 and contains poems by Aldous Huxley, Alan Porter, Leah McTavish Coehn, Geoffrey Cookson, William Kean Seymour, John J. Adams, Sherard Vines, and Osbert, Edith and Sacheverell Sitwell.
The book was dedicated to Mrs Arnold Bennett, who is described as “poetry’s greatest interpretative artist."
This recording was first published by Librivox on 18th March 2018.
Theatre of Varieties by Aldous Huxley on soundcloud https://soundcloud.com/voicesoftoday/09-theatre-of-varieties-by
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If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, infinite. For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things thro’ narrow chinks of his cavern.